Tag Archives: Belief

The World’s Most Unusual Therapist

by Dr. Joe Vitale
www.mrfire.com

Two years ago, I heard about a therapist in Hawaii who cured a complete ward of criminally insane patients--without ever seeing any of them. The psychologist would study an inmate's chart and then look within himself to see how he created that person's illness. As he improved himself, the patient improved.

When I first heard this story, I thought it was an urban legend. How could anyone heal anyone else by healing himself? How could even the best self-improvement master cure the criminally insane?

It didn't make any sense. It wasn't logical, so I dismissed the story.

However, I heard it again a year later. I heard that the therapist had used a Hawaiian healing process called ho 'oponopono. I had never heard of it, yet I couldn't let it leave my mind. If the story was at all true, I had to know more.

I had always understood "total responsibility" to mean that I am responsible for what I think and do. Beyond that, it's out of my hands. I think that most people think of total responsibility that way. We're responsible for what we do, not what anyone else does. The Hawaiian therapist who healed those mentally ill people would teach me an advanced new perspective about total responsibility.

His name is Dr. Ihaleakala Hew Len. We probably spent an hour talking on our first phone call. I asked him to tell me the complete story of his work as a therapist. He explained that he worked at Hawaii State Hospital for four years. That ward where they kept the criminally insane was dangerous. Psychologists quit on a monthly basis. The staff called in sick a lot or simply quit. People would walk through that ward with their backs against the wall, afraid of being attacked by patients. It was not a pleasant place to live, work, or visit.

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The Brain Can Sabotage Resolutions

Health 24

 

The New Year has just begun and already you're finding it hard to keep those resolutions to junk the junk food, get off the couch or kick smoking.

There's a biological reason a lot of our bad habits are so hard to break - they get wired into our brains.

That's not an excuse to give up. Understanding how unhealthy behaviours become ingrained has scientists learning some tricks that may help good habits replace the bad.

"Why are bad habits stronger? You're fighting against the power of an immediate reward," said Dr Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and an authority on the brain's pleasure pathway.

It's the fudge vs broccoli choice: Chocolate's yum factor tends to beat out the knowledge that sticking with veggies brings an eventual reward of lost kilos.

 

Temptations

"We all as creatures are hard-wired that way, to give greater value to an immediate reward as opposed to something that's delayed," Volkow said.

Just how that bit of happiness turns into a habit involves a pleasure-sensing chemical named dopamine. It conditions the brain to want that reward again and again - reinforcing the connection each time - especially when it gets the right cue from your environment.

People tend to overestimate their ability to resist temptations around them, thus undermining attempts to shed bad habits, said experimental psychologist Loran Nordgren, an assistant professor at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.

"People have this self-control hubris, this belief they can handle more than they can," said Nordgren, who studies the tug-of-war between willpower and temptation.

In one experiment, he measured whether heavy smokers could watch a film that romanticises the habit - called Coffee and Cigarettes - without taking a puff.

Upping the ante, they'd be paid according to their level of temptation: Could they hold an unlit cigarette while watching? Keep the pack on the table? Or did they need to leave the pack in another room?

Smokers who'd predicted they could resist a lot of temptation tended to hold the unlit cigarette - and were more likely to light up than those who knew better than to hang onto the pack, said Nordgren. He now is beginning to study how recovering drug addicts deal with real-world temptations.

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Living In Awareness

By Tracy Webb

Sacred Inspirations - http://www.sacredpea.co.uk/

"You create your own reality" and "You are what you think you are." At first I thought this was great and very simple - all I have to do is think in a particular way and I will be/have all the things I ever wished for. However, there are certain universal laws at work. It didn't take long to find out that, although these universal laws work, it is not so much what we do but more about how we are being that makes the difference.

We choose to be certain ways. We can choose to "be happy" or to "be sad" at any given moment - usually this is an unconscious choice. We tend to allow circumstances, past conditioning and social norms to dictate to us how we act. We then find ourselves reacting to situations instead of responding to them. This can be quite a challenge especially as we are so mind dominated.

When we try to act in certain ways because we think we "should" or have been told that it is good to behave in certain ways, we soon end up with feelings of resentment. When we are peaceful, happy and in a place where we understand that God provides for us exactly as we ask and in accordance with the energy vibration we are sending out, then striving becomes futile. We can then see how weak and insignificant our egos are and the process of being able to "Let go and let God" becomes more natural. We split the natural polarities of the universe in two and decide on one over the other - therefore invalidating one in preference of the other. This creates more of the same, as the polarity that is rejected will keep coming back until it is accepted.

We are pulled between bouts of realized peacefulness and our strong ego desires. By shutting out the chatter of the mind/ego, we can more easily hear the God presence or spirit aspect of us. Bringing the mind, body and spirit into balance - instead of the extremes we create. For example - we can abuse our bodies, feed it foods that don't nourish it and take addictive chemicals into our systems. We can let our ego/mind become so engrossed in having and wanting more, believing that we are our minds and are identified by what we have. Continue reading

How Do Beliefs Produce “Driven”, Compulsive Behavior

Marty Lefkoe

http://www.recreateyourlife.com/

Why are so many of us “driven” compulsively to seek or do things that frequently aren’t in our own best self-interest?

You probably aren’t surprised that my answer is: beliefs.  But there is a specific type of belief that results in “driven” behavior.  And it is formed in a very specific way.  Let me explain.

Imagine you are a young child who has created a host of negative beliefs about yourself or about life. (Very few of us escape childhood without forming a bunch of negative self-esteem beliefs.  I’ll explain why in a future blog.) At this point you are in school, interacting with lots of other kids and adults. It dawns on you that you are going to grow up and will have to make your own way in life. You are confronted with a real dilemma, albeit an unconscious one: “How will I make it in life if there’s something fundamentally wrong with me or the world?”

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What You Believe Is What You Expect Is What You Receive


As Featured On EzineArticles

How often have you heard the following statements, "I will believe it when I see it" or, "If I don't expect too much I will not be disappointed". Taking them at face value, these statements seem to make some sense. However, the reality is that they violate some essential universal principles. The truth is that we have a belief and expectation about everything in our current reality. That is why we experience whatever it is that we experience. To say that you do not believe or expect anything is, as far as universal principles are concerned, erroneous. It is more accurate to say you believe something is not so or you expect for something not to happen.

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